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The Law Office of Thomas H. Martin Esq.Serving New Jersey With Integrity And Commitment

Being arrested and charged with a crime is one of the most stressful things that a person can go through.   In addition to a record, a conviction can result in fines or jail time and affect you driver’s license or job. The criminal justice system can be intimidating. You may feel confused and overwhelmed. A New Jersey criminal defense attorney can walk you through the process and protect your rights. Thomas H. Martin Esq. is committed to getting you the best result possible, either through a plea agreement or trial. Mr. Martin is a criminal defense attorney experienced in handling all types of criminal cases, ranging from traffic offenses and low-level misdemeanors to major felonies.  He goes to court all the time and routinely deals with the prosecutors and judges in New Jersey.

With years of experience trying cases in New Jersey, he will work with you to prepare your case for trial, and he will be there to answer any questions or concerns that may arise during the handeling of your casel.   Thomas H. Martin Esq. will provide you with competent advice regarding all available options so that you can make informed decisions regarding how your case will be handled.

When you are going up against the State of New Jersey you need experienced legal counsel. Regardless of whether you are facing an indictable criminal charge in the Superior Court, a drug charge in Municipal Court, a DWI, or even a simple motor vehicle charge you want to have the best possible result. Thomas H. Martin has been helping people face the most difficult of situations for years. Contact Thomas H. Martin at (732) 431-2224 to arrainge a free consultation.

 

United States

Virtually every U.S. state has some forms available on web for most common complaints for lawyers and self-representing litigants; if a petitioner cannot find an appropriate form in his state, he often can modify a form from another state to fit his request. Several United States federal courts published general guidelines for the petitioners and Civil Rightscomplaint forms.[1][2][3]

After the complaint has been filed with court, it has to be properly served to the opposite parties, but usually petitioners are not allowed to serve the complaint personally.[4] The defendants have limited time to respond, depending on the State or Federal rules. A defendant’s failure to answer to a complaint can result in a default judgment in favor of the petitioner.

For example, in United States federal courts, any person who is at least 18 years old and not a party may serve a summons and complaint in a civil case.[4] The defendant must submit an answer within 21 days after being served with the summons and complaint, or request a waiver, according to FRCP Rule 12.[5] After the civil complaint was served to the defendants, plaintiff must as soon as practicable initiate a conference between the parties to plan for the rest of the discovery process.[6]

In many U.S. jurisdictions, a complaint submitted to a court must be accompanied by a Case Information Statement, which sets forth specific key information about the case and thelawyers representing the parties. This allows the judge to make determinations about which deadlines to set for different phases of the case, as it moves through the court system.

There are also freely accessible web search engines to assist parties in finding court decisions that can be cited in the complaint as an example or analogy to resolve similar questions of law.[7] Google Scholar is the biggest database of full text state and federal courts decisions that can be accessed without charge.[7][8] These web search engines often allow one to select specific state courts to search.[7]

Federal courts created the Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER) system to obtain case and docket information from the United States district courts, United States courts of appeals, and United States bankruptcy courts.[9] The system is managed by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts; it allows lawyers and self-represented clients to obtain documents entered in the case much faster than regular mail.[9]

Filing and privacy

In addition to FRCP, many of the U.S. district courts have developed their own requirements included in Local Rules for filing with the Court.[10] Local Rules can set up a limit on the number of pages, establish deadlines for motions and responses, explain whether it is acceptable to combine motion petition with a response, specify if a judge needs an additional copy of the documents (called “judge’s copy”), etc.[11][12] Local Rules can define page layout elements like: margins, text font/size, distance between lines, mandatory footer text, page numbering, and provide directions on how the pages need to be bind together – i.e. acceptable fasteners, number and location of fastening holes, etc. [11][12][13]If the filed motion does not comply with the Local Rules then the judge can choose to strike the motion completely, or order the party to re-file its motion, or grant a special exception to the Local Rules.

According FRCP 5.2, sensitive text like SSN, TIN, DOB, bank accounts and children’s names, should be redacted off the filings made with the court and accompanying exhibits,[14](however, exhibits normally does not need to be attached to the original complaint, but should be presented to Court after the discovery). The redacted text can be erased with black-out or white-out, and the page should have an indication that it was redacted – most often by stamping word “redacted” on the bottom. Alternately, the filing party may ask the court’s permission to file some exhibits completely under seal. A minor‘s name of the petitions should be replaced with initials.[14]

A person making a redacted filing can file an unredacted copy under seal, or the Court can choose to order later that an additional filing be made under seal without redaction.[14]Copies of both redacted and unredacted documents filed with court should be provided to the other parties in the case.

Disclaimer and Privacy Notice

This information on this website is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing of this information does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your unique needs. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls, letters and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established.

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210 Broad Street; Suite 2B, Red Bank, NJ 07701

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